Cubmaster’s Minute

FROM THE DESK OF YOUR CUBMASTER

KEN KASTEN

 

WHAT VOLUNTEERING IN SCOUTING CAN DO FOR YOU

I have been involved in Scouting for the better part of five years.  Starting out as a parent volunteer during my older son’s Tiger year, I soon became an Assistant Den Leader.  The following year, I took over his den as Den Leader.  And the year after, I found myself simultaneously in the role as Den Leader, Popcorn Fundraiser Kernel, and by the end of the year, Assistant Cubmaster.   As our previous Cubmaster began preparations for transitioning to Boy Scouts, I ended up as Cubmaster and have been ever since.  Scouting has taught me valuable leadership skills, found an outlet for expressing my creativity, provided the means to share a personal passion (Outdoor Ethics), and gained new friendships…and a scouting family.  I couldn’t imagine living my life without Scouting.

How (and why) longtime Scouter Linda Case stays committed

 

 

 

REFLECTING ON THE SCOUT LAW POINT FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER: CHEERFUL

Like anyone else, I’ve had to face life’s challenges.  One year in particular was the most difficult in my life.  I changed employers twice, lost several family members due to illness, and struggled with the emotions of my scouting family (6 boys I had led for 4 years) moving on to Boy Scouts.  The principles of Scouting helped to ease the stress of all this change.

It’s easy to act happy when things are going our way.  But what about those times when they don’t?  We make mistakes on our homework because we’re in a rush to get it done.  We lose a piece to a prized LEGO set.  We forget to save our progress on our favorite video game and have to start over from a previous point in the game.  How do we act then?  More importantly, how SHOULD we act?  Can we say we act cheerful?  The challenge is to think of ways to stay positive when we encounter these setbacks.  In the old days of Scouting, the adage was to “whistle away your worries”.  But in today’s age, perhaps the best way to handle these challenges is to remember all the positive things you have in your life…family, friends, happy memories, etc… and maybe you will be able to remain CHEERFUL.

Ten simple steps to boost your happiness

 

 

 

SCOUTING AND SPECIAL NEEDS

As a parent of a child with a learning disability, and having lead several boys with similar challenges, serving youth with special needs has become second nature to me.  You may have heard in the news recently about some special young men achieving the highest rank in Scouting…that of Eagle, even though none of them have ever seen a handbook (https://www.washingtonian.com/2017/10/27/blind-triplets-make-history-becoming-eagle-scouts/).  I’m a firm believer those with disabilities deserve to have the same opportunities as everyone else.  Fortunately, Scouting provides a positive, encouraging environment for all to thrive.  After all, the Cub Scout motto is “Do Your Best!”  For more information on how Scouting benefits youth with learning or physical disabilities, please visit the following web articles:

How to help youth with special needs get the most out of Scouting

 

 

 

Tips for working with Scouts with special needs or disabilities

 

 

 

How to help Scouts with ADHD succeed — without hurting anyone’s feelings

 

 

 

Boys With Autism Can Thrive in Scouting—With Help